Air Pollution

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<h1><strong>AIR POLLUTION</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Definition of Air Pollution</li> <li>Air Polluntants</li> <li>Sources of Air Pollution</li> <li>Consequences of Air Pollution</li> <li>Control Measures of Air Pollution</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Definition of Air Pollution </strong></h2> Air pollution is the discharge of harmful waste substances which contaminate the atmosphere. Air pollutants can be solids, liquids or gases. <p style="text-align: center;"><img class="size-full wp-image-19620 aligncenter" src="https://classhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/air-pollution.jpg" alt="air pollution" width="252" height="181" /><strong>Air Pollution</strong></p> Air pollution is a serious problem in many parts of the world. Smokestacks pump pollution into the air, harming the environment and making it harder to breathe.

Meaning and Types of Habitats

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<h1><strong>HABITAT</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Meaning of Habitat</li> <li>Types of Habitats</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Meaning of Habitat</strong></h2> The place where an organism normally lives is called its habitat. Specifically, it means the home where an organism (plant or animal) inhabits. The biologists who study habitats are called <strong>ecologists</strong>. Ecology is the study of organisms in relation to their environment. There are many kinds of habitats. The school compound is a habitat, a pond is a habitat and the tropical rain forest of Africa is a habitat. <br> <h2><strong>Types of Habitats</strong></h2> There are basically three types of habitat. They are aquatic habitat, terrestrial habitat and arboreal habitat. 1.<strong> Aquatic (Water) Habitat</strong>: This habitat refers to water environment. Organisms found in this habitat are called aquatic organisms. There are three types of aquatic habitat:

Land or Soil Pollution

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<h1><strong>LAND/SOIL POLLUTION</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Definition of Land or Soil Pollution</li> <li>Causes of Land/Soil pollution</li> <li>Effects of Land or Soil Pollution</li> <li>Control of Land/Soil Pollution</li> </ol>   <h2>Definition of Land or Soil Pollution<strong> </strong></h2> Land/soil pollution is the release of refuse and untreated wastes from agricultural and domestic activities and are exposed or dumped on the soil. <h2><strong>Causes of Land/Soil pollution</strong></h2> Causes of land/soil pollution are human activities that can release land/soil pollutants such as: (i) Agricultural activities which releases fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides and animal dung. (ii) Oil spills from refineries and industries. (iii) Illegal dumping of waste refuse and chemicals. (iv) Indiscriminate disposal of domestic waste products on the soil. <h2><strong>Effects of Land or Soil Pollution </strong></h2> Effects of land or soil pollution include the following:

Relationship between Organisms in a Habitat

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<h1><strong>RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ORGANISMS IN A HABITAT</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Biotic and Abiotic Factors</li> <li>Population</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Biotic and Abiotic Factors</strong></h2> Organisms in their habitats are affected by many factors. Factors are the things or conditions that influence their livelihood. These factors are called <strong>biotic</strong> and <strong>abiotic </strong>factors. Biotic factors are the living factors of the habitat such as the living things found in that habitat while the abiotic factors are the non-living factors in the habitat such as oxygen, temperature, dissolved salt, water, sun light, etc. The biotic factors are classified as producers, consumers and decomposers.

Living Things

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<h1><strong>INTRODUCTION TO LIVING THINGS </strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Meaning of Living Things</li> <li>Characteristics of Living Things</li> <li>Classification of Living Things</li> <li>Photosynthesis</li> <li>Differences between Plants and Animals</li> <li>Similarities between Plants and Animals</li> <li>Uses of Plants and Animals</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Meaning of Living Things</strong></h2> Living things are things that have life and can carry out all characteristics of life. <img class="size-full wp-image-32416 aligncenter" src="https://classhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/living-things.jpg" alt="Living Things" width="400" height="198" /> <h2><strong>Characteristics of Living Things</strong></h2> These are activities living things can perform such as: <strong>(MR NIGERCLAD)</strong> <ol> <li><strong>Movement</strong>: Movement is a change in position. Animals move from place to place. Plant only moves in stationary state towards light, water, etc.</li> <li><strong>Respiration</strong>: This is the taking in of oxygen to release energy as a result of breakdown of food in the body.</li>

Nutrient Cycle, Food Chain and Food Web

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<h1><strong>NUTRIENT CYCLE, FOOD CHAIN AND FOOD WEB</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Meaning of Nutrient Cycle in Nature</li> <li>The Water Cycle</li> <li>Nitrogen Cycle</li> <li>Carbon Cycle</li> <li>Food Chain</li> <li>Food Web</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Meaning of Nutrient Cycle in Nature</strong></h2> <strong>Nutrient Cycle in Nature</strong> is the constant circulation of nutrients around the ecosystem. Photosynthesis and respiration drive the movement of oxygen and carbon dioxides to become available all the times.   <h2><strong>The Water Cycle</strong></h2> We use water every day, where does water comes from, water is found almost everywhere in different forms. Water cycle is the continuous movement of water, from land, rivers and oceans to the atmosphere as vapour and from atmosphere back to land and rivers or oceans as rain.

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