Dotted Notes and their Values

Complexity: Standard

<h1><strong>DOTTED NOTES AND THEIR VALUES</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Definition of Dotted Notes</li> <li>Effects of Dots on a Note</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Definition of Dotted Notes</strong></h2> Dotted notes refer to notes which have dots placed after them. In other words, they are notes with dots, e.g.

The Grand Staff/Great Staff

Complexity: Standard

<h1><strong>GRAND STAFF/GREAT STAFF</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>The Great Staff</li> <li>Ledger Lines</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>The Great Staff</strong></h2> The great stave consists of 11 lines and 10 spaces. When the bass and treble clef are combined and connected by a brace (left) and lines, they become the grand staff. This greatly increases the range of pitches that can be noted, and is often used in piano music due to the piano's wide range.<img class="size-full wp-image-20425 aligncenter" src="https://classhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/the-grand-staff-great-staff.jpg" alt="The grand staff/Great Staff" width="235" height="179" />

Methods of Extending Note Values

Complexity: Standard

<h1><strong>METHODS OF EXTENDING NOTE VALUES</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Methods of Extending Note Values</li> <li>The Effects of Tie</li> <li>The Effect of Pause</li> <li>The Effect of Dot</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Methods of Extending Note Values</strong></h2> Apart from dots, there are other methods of extending note values. These include Tie and Pause or Fermata. In other words, there are three major methods of extending note values, namely dots, tie and pause (fermata). <br> <h2><strong>The Effects of a Tie</strong></h2>

Historical Periods of Music

Complexity: Standard

<h1><strong>HISTORICAL PERIODS OF MUSIC</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Musical Periods and Some Major Composers</li> <li>Life and Works of G. F. Handel</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Musical Periods and Some Major Composers</strong></h2> The historical development of western music is divided into stages, popularly referred to as “musical periods”. Apart from the early musical periods from B.C. to 1400 A.D., there are such periods as: (i) Renaissance period (1400 – 1600AD) (ii) Baroque period (1600 – 1750AD) (iii) Classical period (1750 – 1820 AD) (iv) Romantic period (1820 – 1900AD) (v) Modern period (1900 to date)   <h2><strong>Life and Works of G. F. Handel</strong></h2> <img class="size-full wp-image-20431 aligncenter" src="https://classhall.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/06/historical-periods-of-music-life-and-work-of-GF-Handel.jpg" alt="Historical periods of music life and work of GF Handel" width="274" height="303" />

Scales

Complexity: Standard

<h1><strong>SCALES</strong></h1> CONTENT <ol> <li>Definition of Scale</li> <li>Types of Scale</li> </ol>   <h2><strong>Definition of Scale</strong></h2> The word <em>scale</em> comes from the Latin word “scala”. It means ladder. The first seven letters of the English alphabet A-G are used to express the different sounds in use. Scales refer to a series of notes that go in an ascending and descending manner. The <strong>Major scale</strong> is the foundation from which all other scales are formed. C major scale begins with a C and ends with a C. The same rule applies with the rest of the keys where a D Major Scale begins and ends with a D, F Major Scale begins with an F and ends with an F and so on. The notes on a major scale is numbered from 1 to 8, this signifies the intervals. <br> <h2><strong>Types of Scale</strong></h2> The types of scales are;

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